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as solicitor general. nine years ago, they ruled 5 to 4 to uphold the university of michigan law schools limited use of affirmative action. and coming up next on c-span, oral arguments from last week's opening session of the courts full term. this case asks whether courts have jurisdiction to hear lawsuits and forge human rights abuses that occurred out -- for human rights abuses that occurred outside the country. this is an hour. >> we'll hear argument first this term in case 10-1491, kiobel v. royal dutch petroleum. mr. hoffman? >> mr. chief justice, and may it please the court, the plaintiffs in this case received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss.
in the town hall audience. randi? >> paul, thank you very much. >>> there are new voters i.d. laws in place now in several states. we'll look at their potential impact on the election process. >>> if you are leaving the house right now. you continue watching cnn from your mobile phone. take us with you. just go to cnn.com/tv. ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. >>> there are just 24 days left until election day, but still there's some confusion over the actual process. new voter i.d. laws in several states have changed the rules, while other states have seen their laws knocked down or delayed by the courts. so we are focusing on those voter i.d. laws this morning. right now we are focusing on florida. joining me now is florida conservative talk show host bernie thompson. i wanted to ask you -- good morning to you, first of all. >> good morning. >> i want
in battleground states about who gets to vote and how. all morning with we are putting the voter i.d. laws in focus. gang member or home grown terrorist. that is the question in one case. legal editor paul callan breaks it down. >> that is a bunk of malarky. >> debate politics and the eu has a nobel peace prize. we will look at the week that was. turn an entrepreneur's drea. ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. thor's couture gets the most rewards of any small business credit card. your boa! [ garth ] thor's small business earns double miles on every purchase, every day! ahh, the new fabrics, put it on my spark card. [ garth ] why settle for less? the spiked heels are working. wait! [ garth ] great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with double miles or 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? [ cheers and applause ] see life in the best light. [music] transitions® lenses automat
people and some of the authorities thought they could interpret the law to suit their own purposes. that is why the officials signed the documents. it was not until a few years later that they were audited to see if they had violated their own laws. >> with the director is not mentioning is corruption. officials back then issued permits to relatives and friends and just helped themselves. a former mayor approved these houses and had his own construction company build them. officially, the job was noted down as renovating old fisherman's hut that once stood here. >> i do not envy the homeowners. they are innocent and bought the properties in good faith as the third or fourh owners. now they have got to cope with the ruling of the cour their houses will be torn down. >> the enterprising mayor has long since died and cannot be brought to justice. the other corrupt officials are no longer in office. when a legal structure has already been torn down -- a wealthy latvian build a grand new summer residence for himself on an existing foundation right next door to the former summer home of
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't know his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into the chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where
-- berkeley where he attended law school. he was, i'm sad to report, not much of a student, but he was a joiner of fraternities and maker of friends. and it was there at berkeley that he came of age just as california bulldozed its way into a new kind of politics in state history. the political movement that warren was witness to was, importantly from the his perspective, led by a trial lawyer. even as a somewhat shy young boy, warren had dreamed of practicing law in a courtroom, and as a college student he had the opportunity to watch up close one of the most arresting trial lawyers of his generation. hiram johnson, of whom i'm speaking, was a young lawyer in san francisco who was could upon to take over a corruption case against the city's mayor and some co-conspirators in a bribery scandal. he took over the case, he was second chair of the case at the outset but took over the first chair when the lead prosecutor was shot in the head in court by a dismissed juror. law students, take note. [laughter] it -- johnson made his name in that case and went on to serve as governor of cali
.d. laws in focus. >>> and the long road home. space shuttle "endeavour" is on the move cruising the streets of l.a. towards its final resting place. we'll track it all morning. >>> it is saturday, october 13th, i morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. >> i'm victor blackwell. good to have you with us this morning. we are starting with the shooting in denver aimed at the obama campaign headquarters. with us now is vida from kusa. can you tell us where this investigation is happening right now and do police have a suspect? >> victor, this morning i can tell you the focus is really shifting to who shot out that window. police are saying that someone fired one shot, at least one shot at that obama campaign field office in denver yesterday afternoon. now, that office is near ninth avenue and to give you an idea where that is. just on the south end of downtown denver. police are telling us that question that you ask, they have a description of a possible vehicle of interest, they are talk about a vehicle only but have not released any information to us just yet. we haven't heard back from
, and that it should be abolished, regardless of what the laws of the state or the country said at the time. she came to brunswick because her husband got a job at bowdoin college. he stayed in ohio and and later moved to andover, in order to complete his contract there is a professor. she came without him with their children, and she was also six months pregnant. and she moved to brunswick in order to take up residency here, awaiting the arrival of her husband. the stories that were told of harriet beecher stowe is that she was a small and petite woman. she did not take much care in terms of how she dressed. but she was also very numerous for a woman of her time. she was known then mostly as a housewife. she wrote that she was totally overwhelmed with the number of children -- she had seven and she was pregnant -- that is what you would see as an overworked housewife and mother who came to worship here, probably with her children and her sisters, catherine beecher, and they all became members of this church. we first meet uncle tom in his hut. he is in a slave huts. he is learning to read the bible.
't need sharia in the constitution. he has everything he needs in the laws of the united states, because i see them being in great continuity. and for instance, the law, the press law of 1975 is enough to implement any anti-blasphemy laws, for instance. you don't need to implement sharia to go against blasphemy, or even to constraint expression public, freedom of expression. so in a way i'm optimistic, of course, about tunisia but cautiously optimistic. because i think what you see there is the continuity of the old state. it doesn't seem that there are any intentions to change the institutions of the old state. which, in fact, are very useful for both tunis and another to reshape society for tunis and a modernist direction, and for another in an islamist one. so i will stop here, and i look forward to our discussions. thank you spent thank you very much, malika. that was a model, superb analysis and remedy at the same thing. i also have a sign here that says please continue. i'm not exactly what i use that particular sign. but i'm trying to figure that out. it's rather intimidating. gina,
significant to link them. his support for lincoln's policies are very important in the story is just an law so i thought it was time somebody brought that story to light. >> we are the maine state library in a public reading room and were going the maine author's collection. in the early 1920s, henry tunick who is the state laboring at the time started collecting books by maine writers trying to get them signed whenever possible and it has grown into this. >> welcome to maine's capital city on booktv. with the help of our time warner cable partners or the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary culture of this area as we visit with local authors and explore special collections that help tell the history of not only this state but the country as well. >> this is the first parish church in brunswick maine and it's significant to the story of uncle tom's cabin. in many plays places stories began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom dean clips to death. now uncle tom, as you probably know, is the title, the hero of her
-- pill to swallow and the best way to get them to do that was to stress that this was the law. this was the rule of law and he is president was going to take care of the law. it made it much easier, and easier pill for the south to swallow. [applause] >> jonathan is great to be with you today and with all the booklovers at this fabulous festival and with a very distinguished biographer, jean edward smith way think has contributed immeasurably to the eisenhower scholarship and i have to agree he was underestimated definitely and i'm so glad that you have written such a powerful book. i think it's fascinating in reading the book to see that more of the book is focused on the military career, even though as you've just spent almost most of your time talking about the incredible eight years of of the eisenhardt registration, the estate leaned over and whispered to me i have never heard the interstate highway system applauded before. pretty exciting. first-time. >> all those people who were applauding are now going to get on 395 and be stuck in traffic or three hours. [laughter] po
protection of the law. >> reporter: the university automatically admits most of the students based upon their rank and high school class and one quarter of texas freshmen are admitted based upon a formula made up of many factors, one which of is race. bill powers said if the supreme court prevents that -- . >> we would not be given the kind of education to all of our students. we would prepare them to work and it would be a setback for our students and society. >> reporter: howard said diversity benefits all students but chief justice john roberts wanted to hon on you the -- know how the university would determine when it had, quote, a krill critical mass of diversity on campus. us judgeis kennedy could be a key swing vote appearing skeptical telling the texas delegation what you're saying is what counts is race above all. >> justice sodermayer said fisher's lawyer wants to, quote, gut the law. a decision in the fisher- university of texas case is not expected until spring. back to you. >> and thank you. >>>a panel of judges upheld south carolina's voter identification law requiring tho
protection under the law. >> we've recognized that there are some interests in diversity that are beneficial in the educational sphere. but we have said and we continue to say that is not an overriding consideration that has to be administered very narrowly because it's an odious and dangerous classification. >> ifill: but university president bill powers argued that concern is trumped by the need for a diverse student body. >> we believe the educational benefits of diversity are so important that they're worth fighting for all way to the united states supreme court. our lawyers this morning effectively made the case to the justices that diversity-- ethnic and otherwise-- benefits all of the students on our campus. >> ifill: the high court last visited the issue in 2003, deciding five to four to let the university of michigan law school could use race as one factor in its admissions process. before then, the university of texas guaranteed acceptance for the top 10% of students at every high school in the state. but after the michigan decision, texas and other schools added race as a factor f
reforms. and we want a new election law. the current election law is unacceptable. >> the muslim brotherhood says it will boycott the upcoming elections, which could damage the legitimacy of any future parliament. >> back here in germany, there is a year to go until elections, but there's already a taste of campaigning in the air. >> the social democrats picked former finance minister peer steinbruck to challenge the prime minister. then and now, he has gone into this for a spot of bother, and it is all about money. he has been a favorite on the election circuit. h>> but his critics want to know exactly how much and who he has been speaking to. after days of pressure, he is caving in. >> peer steinburck -- steinbruck left journalists out in the cold and was unwilling to respond to questions on income, either, though he received no payment here. previously, he had announced he would shed more light on earnings outside parliament. auditors are now reviewing newly-released documents. after all, he has often adjust experts in the financial world for a fee. legally, he has done nothin
ruling. >> the current law will end months of legal uncertainty for parents, doctors, and religious officials who carry out the procedure. the justice ministry says it will safeguard religious rites while guaranteeing children's safety. >> i think with this bill, we are making it clear that jews and muslims will be able to continue their religious practices in germany. as long as they are compatible with certain regulations. >> the bill introduces new coke -- new conditions, allowing ritual male circumcision, only when the operation adheres to medical procedures. it can only be carried out when the child is not in danger, and parents must be informed about the risk. religious groups say they are happy with the bill, especially as it allows non-doctors to carry out the procedure on children up to six months old, but some pediatricians oppose the new law. >> such an operation should be delayed until the boy is a young adult and old enough to decide whether he wants to have it carried out or not. >> for many jews, this would be unthinkable. according to religious tradition, boys must b
to the pills that bring a pregnancy to an end. it's a radical and controversial step. the law on abortion is very different in northern ireland. it's only allowed in highly restricted circumstances. so only a small number of medical abortions using tablets will be provided here. many other women will still have to travel if they want a termination. because they won't meet the legal requirements in northern ireland. >> i think there will still be a lot of women that have to come to the u.k. because they don't need the legal cry tia of currently in northern ireland. so we'll be treating very small numbers of women. but actually we still want to offer those women choice and access to really good health care and advice. >> abortion provokes a particularly heated debate in northern ireland. it's so heavily restricted that many believe it's entirely illegal. official figures show between 30 and 40 a year are carried out by the m.h.s. the government is facing pressure to publish up to date guidelines. pro life campaigners say this clinic is a blatant challenge to the values of northern ireland.
and they have a connection to the attack, all of this as obama administration is facing new questions from law makers and could have done more about the safety of the four americans killed in libya. among the dead u.s. ambassador chris stevens. >> harris, it has been 25 days since four americans were murdered in libya the latest word from leon paneta, the hunt is on for the people responsible . he said it is too early to tell if the two men arrested were al-qaida affiliated . >> we are doing everything possible to go after those involved in the attack in libya . >> five days after the deadly raid on the embassy in benghazi ambassador susan rice said the attack spontanous and not necessarily terrorism. but she relied on the information that the intelligence community provided to her. information that she said represented the best current ark sessment as of the date of the her television appearances . that is not acceptable for mccane and johnson who say that the obama is misleading congress or the american people or blaming the failure on the intelligence community. ambassador rice said the adm
today, brooke, this was a really politically charged hearing. it reminded me more of kind of l.a. law and a cross examination than really trying to, you know, let the state department make their explanation, whether you believe it or not, whether you believe in the end their explanations or not, cutting off the witnesses a lot, a lot of grandstanding by some members of the committee and i think what is really going to happen is i don't necessarily know if this investigation by the oversight committee is going to be the final word in what happens with this investigation, there is also an independent review board appointed by secretary of state hillary clinton, stellar people whose integrity and credibility is beyond reproach in washington and around the world are going to ask the same exact questions of these witnesses and will then make attack and then i think the american people will try to piece all of this together, and see what happened whether it could have been prevented, and what can be done, most importantly, brooke, what could be done next time to make sure that this doesn't
by the rule of law, support independent judiciary and uphold fundamental freedoms. upholding the rights and the dignity of all citizens, regardless of faith, ethnicity, or gender, should be expected. and then of course we look to governments to let go of power when their time comes, just as the revolutionary libyan transitional national council did this past august. transferring authority to the newly-elected legislature in a ceremony that ambassador chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad-based growth will be a bomb and difficult process. we know that from our own history. within 235 years after our own revolution, we are still working toward that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way, times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. so this is the context in which we have to view of recent events anshaped our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. now, since this is a co
with law enforcement encoding, wyoming, trying to find 10-year-old jessica bridgeway. they are trying to find a connection with another child abduction that happened on monday. in the meantime, releasing this video of jessica and they want people to pay close attention to what she looks like. a small gap between her two front teeth and she also has a sore on the bridge of her nose right now, right where her glasses that, or she may not be wearing her glasses. she disappeared on friday while going to be friends with her daily walk to school. the fbi is involved with the search, which has included a home investigation of jessica shared with her mother. law enforcement interviewing the family, not ruling anything out. here are the mother and father. >> everybody that knows me and knows our family knows that we didn't do anything. i know that it is something that has to be done. you know, they have to get it out there. >> they asked me if i thought that she did it, and i said, there is no way. i've never believed that. i mean, same as i would never do something like that. i don't see see
law stirring up the controversial law. >> the bars in d.c. are staying open until 4 a.m. not everyone thinks that is a good idea. next. when i was younger and... financially stable. we were poor. the mgm casino in michigan. and it changed her life. clerk. way up. insurance... and i make great money. seven will create... twelve thousand jobs. to accountants... and construction workers. place to work with good pay... and great benefits, vote for question seven. catch the great taste of pumpkin before it's gone. hurry into dunkin' donuts and grab a pumpkin muffin or donut today. america runs on dunkin'. we're here! [ giggling ] these days, nobody has time to get sick. mom, i don't feel good. but minuteclinic makes it easy to get well. our nurse practitioners can diagnose and write prescriptions for everything from strep throat to sinus infections with no appointment necessary, so you can feel better in no time. minuteclinic, the medical clinic in cvs pharmacy, now offering flu shots every day, no appointment necessary. find a clinic near you at minuteclinic.com. . >>> a courage alert wit
. and overnight, several law enforcement sources tell me they do believe it is jessica ridgeway, who has been missing nearly a week. the gruesome scene found overnight, just off this roadside, in a remote arvada, colorado, park. >> this afternoon, a body was discovered. >> reporter: investigators worked under the floodlights of a fire truck. >> the arvada police department and the westminster police department are working jointly with additional resources to process that crime scene. >> reporter: police haven't officially identified the body. but sources tell abc news, it is the missing 10-year-old. earlier wednesday, police announced jessica's parents are not suspects in her disappearance. >> the focus shifts to an unknown suspect, as we think that she was abducted. >> reporter: y >> we don't want any parent, any parent, to ever experience this in their whole entire life. >> reporter: the body was found about seven miles from jessica's home in westminster, colorado, and about seven miles from the town of superior, where her backpack and water bottle were found sunday, left on a sidewalk. the
of market and media could act as a surveillance tool for law enforcement -- law enforcement and public health officials. is it possible we could integrate accreditation with in this form of marketing? that is a larger question to ask. facebook's terms and conditions say you cannot be an online pharmacy on facebook on bless you are certified, but we do not know what that certification requires, and our site is still up. and cooperation. if this is a surveillance methods, you should be providing this information to the manufacturers, chief public health officials, and law enforcement to actively follow up. i will and the presentation. if you want more information, you can contact myself. i do not know if we have enough time for questions. we would be happy to take them. i want to thank the partnership for safe medicine for their support and a professor and the institute of health studies and all his leadership in our particular research. thank you very much. [applause] >> i have a softball question. hopefully. one of the things you mentioned about social media, we have four or five diffe
have been checking us out. and take a look. >> some girls are even barking at a loss of law >> it is great because people are taking pictures. and you have had your time. >> detroit is in done. the world series whoever is there. >> it is all confidence when you come to the 80s. >> and we are going to woop a little ass... >> a very fine day. the fans were just there inside the coliseum and i can tell you it is allowed. they are yelling. trying to get that and they are down to- nothing. reporting live, j. r. stone, kron 4. >> gary will have the highlights as they both try to keep their respective seasons alive as a leader. >> back on the job. >> it is a new day. ross mirkarimi returns to the office he vacated after being are rusted for domestic abuse in january. >> city supervisors rejecting the mayor's call for removing four official misconduct. >> not sustained. >> this was a celebration of his supporters. >> we love across! >> domestic violence opponents and the mayor are reacting with disbelief. >> maureen kelly was at city hall as the embattled chair. >> ross mirkarimi is
. women get paid. there are equal-pay laws. i'm rebutting, if i might. >> every physician -- >> dr. ruiz, let her finish. congresswoman, please. >> the people are concerned about security, they're concerned about national security. they're concerned about domestic security. they want to know they can pay their bills. the lilly led dth better pay act was strictly out of nancy pelosi. you didn't answer the question if you would vote for nancy pelosi or not. we know the answer. >> we could go on for hours clearly, but unfortunately the hour is quickly coming to a close many time now for the last words from our candidates. dr. ruiz, you're up first. >> thanks again to "the desert sun" for hosting this debate and a special thanks to those of you who devoted time to watching it. engaged and informed voters are so essential to a successful democracy. as candidates we owe it to you to tell you who we are and where we differ. the freedom to disagree and speak our mind is the most american of traditions and values. but there is a big difference between disagreeing and character assassination. cong
'm doing. i take your point. i vaguely remember the three laws of dynamics. so yeah, i take your point but my point is less would've the undergraduate, i don't know we can argue but how important that is, but more, i take your point about the commercialization and the browsers and all that was definitely private, occasional borrowing for more basic research, but my point was that seems like a really critical element was sort of just was the critical mass of people out there, and the guys who founded google were guys who were getting their ph.d's at stanford, you know, and they developed an algorithm out of their training. and just the fact that she did have people working on systems engineering, and it's less the undergraduate but more the government finance, dod research, networking capabilities and all that. look, it's sort of unprovable but there is a story that the critical mass that few -- field itself is built up out there and if you want an explanation for why it happened here and so little happen if their. >> guest: one thing i would say is this. in leading up to 2000 women got
worse. but don't dismiss the old framework lightly. credit for the 1986 reform law begone -- belongs to democrats like bill bradley and the senate. just as much as to president reagan. as a member of the house back then, not only voted for it, fight with the votes to make sure it passed. i was on the committee set up by dan rostenkowski to get it done. the approach but a good deal of sense at the time. then as now, the code was littered with agrees is loopholes that needed to be reform. recall the so-called passive loss schools that were in place but then. they allowed wealthy taxpayers to gain the system. someone could invest in a bowling alley and then, if the bullets lost money, they could take a ride up many times larger than their initial money and what of their entire income tax liability. we need to get rid of such a gimmicky tax shelter. puring these loopholes allowed us to turn to cut rates. at the time, that made sense, too. while it is critically important to insure that everyone, especially those at the top pay their fair share, 50% top federal tax rate is what we have un
years ago the team made this unmanned aircraft guided by the law, it flies to locations and takes pictures and returns. at the end of march of last year, the aircraft made headlines. it flew over the major nuclear plant in fukushima right after the disaster. from a height of 400 meters, it took photos. this shows the further details of the damage. it provided crucial information on where to spray water and how much. until now, the company could only take still pictures. but after fukushima, the crew decided to make a movie cam that takes movie images in 3d. their goal was to get a bird's-eye view. they decided to use a kind of helicopter that had six rotors. it lifts off vertically, controlling speed and direction is easy. the team has just started taking pictures. one person controls the copter, the other the camera. they try to send the copter under a low substantial bridge. but as the march copter rises, part of it is in the chart. he succeeds. the camera is so good it can even though the texture of rocks and record clear images of places people can't reach from the ground. >>
countries to reunite almost all european continents. freedom, democracy. rule of law and respect for human rights are the ones that people all over the world aspire to. >> but the e.u. has won the peace prize in the midst of an acute financial crisis which has led to violent demonstrations in greece and spain. in europe, all divisions are reopening. perhaps that's why the european -- the nobel committee wants to boost it, prevent it from fragmenting. >> well, it's turned up a lot of discussion. we'll be going to the self-appointed capital of the e.u., brussels in a moment. first of all, we're going to catch you up on other stories making headlines around the world. idea's winner of the nobel prize for literature says he hoping the compatriot who won two years ago would soon be freed as he was jailed in 2009 and serving an 11-year sentence for inciting subversion of to the power. >> and the president's mohammed to remove the country's top prosecutor. as a farce, the president's move follows an angry public response to the acquittal of a group of supporters of the outgoing regime. reducing t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 91 (some duplicates have been removed)

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